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In his 1930's futuristic novel, Brave New World, Aldous Huxley predicted a society where the human race was created in a laboratory and carried to term in incubators. At the time it was regarded as being ludicrously impossible. The idea of cloning in the eighties required multiple reproductions of specialized cells. Even then, the possibility of cloning was unachievable. Recently, scientists cloned a lamb, simply by replicating the cell in the skin tissue. It is now happening in all parts of the world: Scotland, England, America, and Australia. As technology increases, doubts and "what-ifs" turn into realities. Three essays were examined concerning cloning endangered and extinct animals and the benefits and detriments of therapeutic cloning.
Matt Ridley, from the article "The Lure of Detinction", claims there is "finally a noble use for cloning. To date," he states, "it has only been promised to serve the human race's vanity, by producing doppelgangers, and hypochondria, by providing spare livers. But with the announcement that cloning has been applied to vanished species, to reverse their extinction, it suddenly seems a rather higher calling" (1-4). A Massachusetts's company has taken thefirst steps by cloning a rare Indian wild ox embryo called a guar and implanting it into a cow. Once successful, the company plans to do the same for a recently extinct Spanish goat called a bucardo. The possibilities are limited for the time being however, as long-extinct creatures can not be included in the "wish list" due to inadequate knowledge of their molecular biology. Even reptile, bird, and amphibian cloning are quite a ways off because they lay eggs. However, by allowing research to continue, time will produce stunning results.
In addition to reviving extinct animals, Great Britain is currently requesting permission to pursue what is called therapeutic cloning. Accordin…

In his 1930's futuristic novel, Brave New World, Aldous Huxley predicted a society where the human race was created in a laboratory and carried to term in incubators. At the time it was regarded as being ludicrously impossible. The idea of cloning in the eighties required multiple reproductions of specialized cells. Even then, the possibility of cloning was unachievable. Recently, scientists cloned a lamb, simply by replicating the cell in the skin tissue. It is now happening in all parts of the world: Scotland, England, America, and Australia. As technology increases, doubts and "what-ifs" turn into realities. Three essays were examined concerning cloning endangered and extinct animals and the benefits and detriments of therapeutic cloning.
Matt Ridley, from the article "The Lure of Detinction", claims there is "finally a noble use for cloning. To date," he states, "it has only been promised to serve the human race's vanity, by producing doppelgangers, and hypochondria, by providing spare livers. But with the announcement that cloning has been applied to vanished species, to reverse their extinction, it suddenly seems a rather higher calling" (1-4). A Massachusetts's company has taken thefirst steps by cloning a rare Indian wild ox embryo called a guar and implanting it into a cow. Once successful, the company plans to do the same for a recently extinct Spanish goat called a bucardo. The possibilities are limited for the time being however, as long-extinct creatures can not be included in the "wish list" due to inadequate knowledge of their molecular biology. Even reptile, bird, and amphibian cloning are quite a ways off because they lay eggs. However, by allowing research to continue, time will produce stunning results.
In addition to reviving extinct animals, Great Britain is currently requesting permission to pursue what is called therapeutic cloning. Accordin…